SEA LEGS: The 11 films in the Ocean Film Festival document the stories of those whose lives are linked to the ocean, including free diver Guillaume Nery , surfers, swimmers and oceanographers. This picture: Julie Gautier
Nanjing Night Net

SEA LEGS: The 11 films in the Ocean Film Festival document the stories of those whose lives are linked to the ocean, including free diver Guillaume Nery, surfers, swimmers and oceanographers.

SEA LEGS: The 11 films in the Ocean Film Festival document the stories of those whose lives are linked to the ocean, including free diver Guillaume Nery , surfers, swimmers and oceanographers.

SEA LEGS: The 11 films in the Ocean Film Festival document the stories of those whose lives are linked to the ocean, including free diver Guillaume Nery , surfers, swimmers and oceanographers.

SEA LEGS: The 11 films in the Ocean Film Festival document the stories of those whose lives are linked to the ocean, including free diver Guillaume Nery, surfers, swimmers and oceanographers.

SEA LEGS: The 11 films in the Ocean Film Festival document the stories of those whose lives are linked to the ocean, including free diver Guillaume Nery, surfers, swimmers and oceanographers.

SET to light up the screens of Newcastle this month, the Ocean Film Festival is making a splash across Australia.

The festival, which features 11international short films, will be showcased on March 15 at Tower Cinemas in Newcastle’s CBD.

The films document the experiences of divers, surfers, swimmers and oceanographers during two hours of footage.

Viewers are invited to share in the stories of world champion free diver Guillaume Nery on a deep underwater quest and the touching story of Pascale Honore as she rediscovers her passion for surfing, years after a car accident left her paralysed.

Other stories include that of spear-fisherman Kimi Werner, off the coast of Hawaii, and an 82-year-old veteran diver’s tale of the harsh realities of life for female free divers in South Korea.

The films provide audiences with a true appreciation of an ocean culture, which reaches every corner of the globe and encourage a deep respect for the world’s oceans and its creatures.

The festival coincides with recent widespread opposition to a proposal by the federal government to cull sharks along the West Australian coastline.

Ocean Film Festival spokeswoman Jemima Robinson said the festival worked with the Australian Marine Conservation Society to promote the preservation of the world’s oceans.

‘‘Eighty-two per cent of Australians don’t support the shark cull and neither do we,’’ Miss Robinson said.

‘‘We are all about inspiring people to love the ocean. People naturally protect what they love.’’